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BASIL, SWEET - ESSENTIAL OIL

  • $14.00

Ocimum basilicum   Grown in Egypt

Basil Oil Chavicol or Sweet Basil, is a warm, fresh and spicy scented essential oil.

Process: Steam Distilled Essential Oil

Plant Part: Leaves and Tops

Note: Top to Middle Note

Aroma Families: Anisic, Herbal

Aroma: Sweet, pungent, clove-like, somewhat bitter green/herbaceous aroma, with a soft balsamic-woody undertone; very persistent sweetness.

Blends With:

Bergamot, Black Pepper, Cardamom, Cedarwood, Clary Sage, Coriander, Frankincense, Geranium, Ginger, Helichrysum, Lemon, Lemongrass, Lime, Mandarin, Marjoram, Niaouli, Orange, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sandalwood &  Spikenard.

Benefits:

Sweet Basil can help to stimulate, uplift, energise and clarify. It is also said to be helpful in repelling insects and bad odours.

Recommended use:

Among its worthy attributes, it is said that Basil opens the heart and brings harmony to the mind, as its effects on the emotions can be very strengthening when suffering fear or loss.*1. Recommended for skin care, blends, burners and soaps.

Care Instructions:

Not recommended for ingestion. Avoid in pregnancy

Information on the traditional uses and properties are provided on this site is for educational use only, and is not intended as medical advice. If you have any serious health concerns, you should always check with your health care practitioner before use.

Easy Recipe:

Mental Clarity & Breathe Well Mask Spray

Basil can boost circulation to the brain, enhancing mental sharpness & focus. 

Equipment:

50ml bottle with atomiser sterilised

Ingredients:

Distilled Water

20 drops Solubiliser

3 drops Basil

3 drops Peppermint

3 drops Eucalyptus

Method:

Mix approx 10ml of warm distilled water in with solubiliser & add all the essential oils. Stir gently & once blended add the remaining water. Stir gently.

Put spray on bottle and spray on mask.

References:

1. Miller, Light and Bryan. Ayurveda & Aromatherapy - The Earth Essential Guide to Ancient Wisdom and Modern Healing, 1995, p. 222.